The University of Southampton
Warning!Your browser is out-of-date and not compatible with this website. Pleasedownload a new secure and faster browserto view this website correctly.
The Tony Davies High Voltage Laboratory

Seminars

Speaker(s): Professor Keith Smettem
Organiser: Dr Ian L Hosier
Time: 04/11/2015 14:00-15:00
Location: B45/45

Abstract

Validation of solute transport and exchange process models requires data obtained from measurement of chemical concentration changes through time at some point (or points) downstream, or down-gradient from a chemical injection point. To date, the acquisition of such data has been expensive and time consuming. In this study a new, low-cost (in the order of a euro) potentiometric chloride sensor is used in a distributed array to obtain data with high spatial and temporal resolution for monitoring chemical transport and mixing processes in the environment. The applications presented are: 1) Monitoring in-stream hydrodynamic transport and dispersive mixing of an injected chemical and 2) Determination of groundwater residence time distribution and downslope hydraulic connection between a hillslope and near-stream zone. Advantages and limitations of the measurement system are discussed, together with some new insights into the presence of retarded and stagnant zones in the respective flow fields.

Speaker Biography

Professor Keith Smettem

Professor Keith Smettem obtained is Ph.D degree from Sheffield University, Sheffield, U.K., in 1982. He is Professor of Environmental Engineering in the Department of Civil, Environmental and Mining Engineering at the University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia, and he has more than 200 publications and patents in the fields of hydrology, soil physics, plant water relations and environmental engineering. Professor Smettem started his career as a research scientist with the Division of Soils at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia. In 1995 he joined the University of Western Australia and became full professor in 2007. Current research areas include ecohydrologic responses to climate change, development of woody perennial feedstocks for bioenergy generation, development of field methods for measurement of soil physical properties, application of distributed sensor systems for hydrologic data acquisition, impacts of land use change on runoff, chemical transport in soils and streams. He is a Member of the American Geophysical Union, the European Geophysical Union and is a Past President of the Australian Society of Soil Science.

Speaker(s): Professor Keith Smettem
Organiser: Dr Ian L Hosier
Time: 04/11/2015 14:00-15:00
Location: B45/45

Abstract

Validation of solute transport and exchange process models requires data obtained from measurement of chemical concentration changes through time at some point (or points) downstream, or down-gradient from a chemical injection point. To date, the acquisition of such data has been expensive and time consuming. In this study a new, low-cost (in the order of a euro) potentiometric chloride sensor is used in a distributed array to obtain data with high spatial and temporal resolution for monitoring chemical transport and mixing processes in the environment. The applications presented are: 1) Monitoring in-stream hydrodynamic transport and dispersive mixing of an injected chemical and 2) Determination of groundwater residence time distribution and downslope hydraulic connection between a hillslope and near-stream zone. Advantages and limitations of the measurement system are discussed, together with some new insights into the presence of retarded and stagnant zones in the respective flow fields.

Speaker Biography

Professor Keith Smettem

Professor Keith Smettem obtained is Ph.D degree from Sheffield University, Sheffield, U.K., in 1982. He is Professor of Environmental Engineering in the Department of Civil, Environmental and Mining Engineering at the University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia, and he has more than 200 publications and patents in the fields of hydrology, soil physics, plant water relations and environmental engineering. Professor Smettem started his career as a research scientist with the Division of Soils at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia. In 1995 he joined the University of Western Australia and became full professor in 2007. Current research areas include ecohydrologic responses to climate change, development of woody perennial feedstocks for bioenergy generation, development of field methods for measurement of soil physical properties, application of distributed sensor systems for hydrologic data acquisition, impacts of land use change on runoff, chemical transport in soils and streams. He is a Member of the American Geophysical Union, the European Geophysical Union and is a Past President of the Australian Society of Soil Science.

RSS-Feed of the TDHVL Seminars

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website.If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×